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Amy Webb: How I Hacked Online Dating,Customers who bought this item also bought

 · Amy Webb was having no luck with online dating. The dates she liked didn't write her back, and her own profile attracted crickets (and worse). So, as any fan Amy Webb. 1, ratings reviews. Forty million people date online each year. Most don’t find true love. Thanks to Data, a Love Story, their odds just got a whole lot better. Data, Shelves: non-fiction, dating, online-dating, memoir. Amy Webb's story, for all of her anal-retentive, control-freaky, color-coded spreadsheets is a pleasure to read. Her story of travel,  · Amy Webb, author of Data, A Love Story: How I Gamed Online Dating to Meet My Match, took to the TED stage to tell the story of how she hacked online dating. After a bad If that sounds familiar, then you’ll relate to Amy Webb’s story, in which she tries and fails in online dating – and tries again. And this time, she does those matching algorithms of those ... read more

Of course, it wouldn't be a story if it was always smooth sailing. Webb began her online dating journey by copying lines from her resume and posting them into her online dating profile. I'm sure you can guess how that turned out: not well. The dating site's algorithm paired her with terrible matches that led to even worse dates. Some would give up then, but not Amy Webb. She began collecting data points during her awful dates. She tracked things like awkward sexual remarks, bad vocabulary, and the number of times her dates attempted to high-five her.

After gathering the data, she crunched the numbers and started making correlations. Perhaps the most surprising finding was that the algorithms on online dating sites weren't actually failing. They were doing exactly what they were designed to do: take user-generated information and match it with other user-generated information. The problem with Webb was that she'd put bad information - her resume - into the algorithm in the first place. Related Article: Amy Webb Tells TED How She Hacked Online Dating Part II.

I am: Straight Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender Asexual Couple Group. I live in: United States Canada United Kingdom Australia Brazil China France Germany India Indonesia Ireland Italy Japan Korea Malaysia Mexico Morocco New Zealand Philippines Russia South Africa South Korea Spain Sweden Switzerland Thailand Vietnam International. How, you may be asking, does Amy Webb finally attract the man of her dreams? spoiler alert? Short answer: No. Not even a little bit. Amy Webb finds her current I assume husband by doing the following: going to the gym regularly, eating better, and having styled photos as her profile pictures.

Or just come for the joy of reading the anti-rom com. flag 31 likes · Like · see review. View all 4 comments. Nov 25, Jenne rated it it was ok Shelves: arc , nonfiction , fiftyfifty-me Well, this was a very sweet story, but I don't think the author is taking her own advice that correlation does not equal causation. She has a whole bunch of fun crunchy math stuff, like with equations and things, but I don't really see any evidence that her 'gaming' of online dating made much difference at all.

It seemed to me she pretty much got lucky and fell in love with the first guy she went out with after she rewrote her profile. Useful advice that exists in the book: 1 try to look hot in Well, this was a very sweet story, but I don't think the author is taking her own advice that correlation does not equal causation.

Useful advice that exists in the book: 1 try to look hot in your profile pictures 2 don't just copy your résumé into your profile although if you thought that was a good idea you probably have larger problems 3 decide what sort of person you want, and go out with people who are like that.

flag 21 likes · Like · see review. View all 3 comments. Feb 10, Anna rated it really liked it Shelves: romance. Amy Webb delivers a poignant, honest portrayal of the modern search for love. I was quickly captured by her first person narrative that managed to engage and not pander to her audience in exploring her quest for her perfect match.

Her world of internet dating is as gruesome as the one I remember, but with spreadsheets in hand she decides to "game the system. If I just date enough men, she Amy Webb delivers a poignant, honest portrayal of the modern search for love. If I just date enough men, she rationalized, I will eventually meet my match. Date after horrific date leads her mathematically inclined brain to come up with a rating formula.

I have to wonder how I would have rated some of my online dates how would the guy who asked if I would like to kiss his butterfly tattoo rate? Not well I'm sure. She decides to use reason and logic to weed out the men who would never make her happy. With the realization that they would have to like her back, she then tackles the question of what women do right when designing online profiles.

Along with the enjoyable narrative, the reader gets some interesting background on the history of online dating and some helpful hints on how to get over your ego and write a "super profile.

Data, A Love Story is a rallying cry for every woman who has been told to settle. While her goal was to find a husband, I think it does criticize the crazy notion that, in this day and age, any mate is better than going alone. flag 13 likes · Like · see review. Mar 24, Jane rated it it was ok. The biggest problem with this book is that the author comes off as very unlikeable.

And for a memoir, there is remarkably little emotion throughout the whole book. Look, I love a good spreadsheet as much as Amy Webb. And I get that this is about online dating and your search for Mr. But when you toss in that your mother was diagnosed with terminal cancer in the midst of all this, not only does that make it really hard to sympathize with you trying to find a date who doesn't use "irregardle The biggest problem with this book is that the author comes off as very unlikeable.

But when you toss in that your mother was diagnosed with terminal cancer in the midst of all this, not only does that make it really hard to sympathize with you trying to find a date who doesn't use "irregardless" in conversation, but you darned well better be prepared to talk about how this affects your drive to get married and have children. Because it's got to have affected you. And if you weren't interested in showing us how it affected you, don't write a memoir.

Write Love in the Time of Algorithms instead. This gets two stars, instead of one, because I actually finished the whole thing. Silly me, I kept thinking that at some point someone would have some feelings. flag 12 likes · Like · see review. Aug 10, Laura rated it did not like it. I agree with these comments offered by another reviewer: "I realized I was feeling really, really bothered by this book.

I think it goes deeper than frustration with her neuroticism and lack of social grace. It's that she has a genuine disregard for other people! the most duplicitous turns out to be Ms. Webb, who engages with 96 women on jdate who all believe her to be a man looking to date women. responding to messages of unknowing women was so Almost as mean-spirited as I agree with these comments offered by another reviewer: "I realized I was feeling really, really bothered by this book.

Almost as mean-spirited as her merciless mocking of these women's profiles, who never intended to put themselves out there for such a purpose. abide by these things called "ethics" - which would not allow duping all those women because you can't get a man.

I was aghast at Webb's treatment of these women for her own purposes, but I shouldn't have been. In her listing of 72 traits she wants in her ideal man, she makes her values clear. Her listing fails to make mention of wanting a guy who is kind to others, who appreciates their dignity and worth. He should be VERY GOOD with money, be VERY GOOD in bed, and even care about the music of George Michael. But on human kindness, she'll take a pass. View 2 comments.

Jan 10, Bethany Erin rated it liked it. I met my boyfriend online. The hard part is being completely honest about a who you are, and b what you want out of online dating. So when I heard about Data, A Love Story I was immediately intrigued. Which is, you know, a little creepy, but fine. Read the rest of my review here flag 10 likes · Like · see review. View 1 comment. Apr 25, Amanda rated it it was ok. Frustrated by horrendous dates with men she met online, Webb decides to approach dating websites with a new strategy.

She draws up an exhaustive list of exactly what she's looking for, ranks the qualities with numerical values, creates "tiers" think "most important," "desirable," and "would be nice" and commits to not meeting anyone who doesn't score at least out of But what's really brazen is how she creates several male profiles and masquerades as "Frank" and "Ben" in order to see Frustrated by horrendous dates with men she met online, Webb decides to approach dating websites with a new strategy.

But what's really brazen is how she creates several male profiles and masquerades as "Frank" and "Ben" in order to see what kind of women she's up against in the online dating pool.

While the concept is intriguing, the book soon became tiresome. Webb went on and on about her own career achievements and the minutae of what she was wearing and the take-out food she was eating while building her online fake profiles. The other annoying thing about the book is how mean-spirited Webb seems to be. At one point she describes a meeting in which her supervisor pronounces the state "Illinois" with an audible "s" on the end. Yeah, it's a stupid mistake, but she takes such glee in staring him down and trying to make him feel like an idiot, that instead of wanting to chuckle at the guy, I wanted to slap her.

flag 8 likes · Like · see review. May 07, Joanna rated it it was ok Shelves: nonfiction , read , biography-memoir , rwssummer. I wanted to like this book. I wanted to like the author. Sadly, nope and nope. The author comes across as neurotic, whiny, a tad unethical, and surprisingly vicious.

The book has a good project, but it never hit the mark as either advice or an interesting memoir. The author showed almost none of her softer emotions. She tells us that her mother had terminal cancer and that she felt sad.

But there's no vulnerability, no opening of her heart to the reader -- just factual telling. She recounts her I wanted to like this book. She recounts her bad dates in funny, but detached, language. Her method of "gaming" online dating is both overly complicated and overly obvious. She engages a complicated research project that involves creating ten fake male profiles to interact with women to inspect the "competition.

While she creates rules for the interactions to try to prevent unethical line-crossing e. Not the crime of the century, but wrong nonetheless. And she analyzes word choice and interactions to come to the completely unsurprising realization that her profile should have good pictures and be relatively upbeat and approachable. She also comes up with a 72 point list of requirements for a partner and a scoring system. In an author that I'd come to root for and like, I might have found this list endearing if silly, but since I found the author rather off-putting, I found the list seriously ridiculous and neurotic instead.

Finally, the book suffers from the smug, happy-ending that seems to be part of the format for these quarter-life-crisis books, but that's really pretty annoying. Right from the start, she tells you that things worked out and she met her happily-ever-after husband. And I suppose she wouldn't have much credibility writing about how to game the system if it hadn't worked.

But it still feels awfully smug: "Look at me all happy and married. My life was incomplete until I finally met the right man. Take my advice and you can too flag 6 likes · Like · see review. Mar 04, Helen rated it it was ok Shelves: memoirs-biographies-autobiographies , non-fiction , romance. Can you spell "false advertising"? I kinda felt gamed after reading this - sure she tweaked her profile but I think her magical match was more of a happy coincidence than anything else.

It wasn't really rocket science, even if you can go all geeky with mathematical formulas. The point of this book only really clicked when I read she founded a digital strategy consultancy.

Apr 16, Zoe Heimdal rated it really liked it Shelves: audiobook-listens. This is a true story where the author chronicles her efforts to not just sit back and let love find her -- but instead, she actively works the online-dating system to find her PERFECT match. A man who scores very high, on the scale of things that are important to her.

On one hand it's pretty great I love people who are active problem solvers. I could not help but be impr This is a true story where the author chronicles her efforts to not just sit back and let love find her -- but instead, she actively works the online-dating system to find her PERFECT match.

I could not help but be impressed by her go-gettum style. And she IS successful in the end which she states at the beginning, so this is not a spoiler! However she IS a little nuts. The way she breaks down her life in min charted increments her obsession with numerically tracking so many things binders of spreadsheets, color-coding, white boards at home, late nite lost sleep I'm just saying that I can imagine some people would find her too extreme to actually enjoy reading about her.

To me though, she was mostly just extremely quirky and I can appreciate me some quirky. The parts that challenged me and my enjoyment of her process were: 1 There is a lot of comparison of herself against other women on the online dating sites and although there ends up being some changing of herself to be a better version of herself there's a fine line that somebody could take to become somebody they actually aren't, just to land a man.

and just for the sake of the feelings of the other women although she never let the interactions go on more than three times -- I don't like the element of deceit and then also, the way that this will give other people ideas potentially to do similar things, and so you'd potentially never be able to trust a response on an online dating site.

That being said -- I finished the book and enjoyed it -- and would recommend it but only for the type of people who the above sounds interesting. However if you're a person who would be put-off by the thought of a woman working extremely hard to find a husband -- then you will absolutely hate this book. but who really appreciates the go-gettum-factor -- I give it four stars.

flag 4 likes · Like · see review. Jun 22, Roz Warren rated it liked it. The Mary Poppins Guide to Husband Hunting! Wrongs that eHarmony and JDate kept matching her with. So she sat down, drink in hand, and listed every sing The Mary Poppins Guide to Husband Hunting! So she sat down, drink in hand, and listed every single quality she wanted her future husband to have.

But how to find him? First Webb decided to check out the competition. She went online, disguised as her dream date. This meant upgrading her photo. The old one showed her in a suit, giving a lecture at a prestigious conference. Many seemed like winners.

Webb, a lover of spreadsheets and data analysis, was no longer leaving anything to chance. But what I really loved was that Mary Poppins Husband Hunting List. Especially golf. Stylish balding with high-end glasses? This is non-negotiable. Likes Peter Sellers movies. I cannot stress this enough. He has to be amazing. And not on the list, but surely implicit? So what happened when Webb finally found Brian, Mr. They court. He proposes marriage. She accepts. Not only that but she also gets a published book out of the experience.

Perhaps not. This review first appeared on www. flag 3 likes · Like · see review. Feb 11, Amanda rated it really liked it. A bad break-up and several horrific first and last!

dates might have driven any other woman to her tiny dining room to partake of an entire pie alone. Not Amy Webb. Our intrepid heroine goes in for pie charts instead, and does for us what we have been heretofore unwilling to do for ourselves - she breaks down the system of dating into small, bite-sized and manageable pieces.

The result of Webb's efforts are chronicled in Data, A Love Story: How I Gamed Online Dating and Met My Match. Herein, W A bad break-up and several horrific first and last! Herein, Webb bravely documents her first hesitant but hopeful attempts at dating after the end of a relationship, all of which range from wince-worthy to beat-about-the-head-and-shoulders-with-a-blunt-implement-worthy.

After a last-straw dating disaster, Webb opens a bottle of wine and spends a maniacal weekend breaking down the data on jdate. com into bite-sized, easily digestible pieces, so she can crack the intricate code of online dating. After what she calls her "Mary Poppins List", a 72 point list of qualities in a mate some essential, some just desirable , she realizes who she is looking for.

She also decides to spend several weeks logging as "man seeking woman", so she can check out the profiles that rank as her competition. What she learns about her potential dating pool and about how to market herself therein is the crux of Webb's story, and what ultimately lead her - no spoilers here, since Webb reveals this outcome in her own title - to the perfect match for her.

As a math-o-phobe of long standing, but one who spent much of the late 90s and early s on dating websites, I found the minutiae of breaking down date trending quite interesting. Even more interesting is how Webb uses her information to assess herself as she appears in her online profile and particularly how her newly discovered data rates her past relationships.

After crafting this detailed list, Webb realizes that when she compares it against her past relationships - including the shipwreck that begins the book - none of her past loves had more than four of her required traits. Out of seventy-two. Setting aside the trending and the rating system and how Webb would ultimately recreate herself on the site in her "super profile", Webb learns that much of her problems have resulted not from being too picky, but by not being picky enough.

Even for those of us who may never return to the world of online dating, the book offers two extraordinarily useful bits of information. The first, of course, is the Mary Poppins list. If you don't know what you're looking for, you can't possibly know how to find it. The second is Webb's discovery of what makes the "popular" girls popular surprise, it's not just being a size zero and how to accomplish it in her own Amy-like way.

Webb's first person narrative makes no effort to articially polish anything. From the details of the unraveling affair that opens the book, to her mother's ultimately futile battle with a rare form of cancer, she is direct and unsentimental, but still allows a warmth and vulnerability to come through. Her "loud, Jewish family" plays a large secondary role in this book, including her sister Hilary, who operates as sounding board, fashion consultant, best friend, ninja defender and thread of reason, and her parents, who are loving, but anxious to see Webb settled and happy.

I listened to the audiobook, which has its pros and cons. On the upside, Webb reads the book herself. She's funny, she's self-effacing, she's unapologetically awkward and geeky and has no trouble detailing her many quirks and singularities.

One hilarious chapter illustrates her absolutely religious worship of color coding and spreadsheets when she documents her preparation to meet a therapist for the first time, and presents a three-holed binder with charts, graphs, a spreadsheet, all detailing her current emotional and psychological state. As anyone who has ever been in therapy can imagine, the therapist seems to consider this as more of a symptom than a study aid, which baffles Webb.

The other positive side of the audio book is that Webb's ultimate perfect match, her now-husband Brian Wolf, weighs in with his reaction to Amy, to her system, to her Mary Poppins list which he calls "creepy, but not for the reasons you'd expect. Given how invested we are in Webb's welfare by the end of the book, we're happy to leave her in his hands. The downside of the audiobook is that we miss the print edition artwork - photos and graphs I'm guessing they are in abundance, given who we're dealing with here.

I am seriously considering investing in the Kindle edition, once I have some discretionary capital at my disposal. Absent the artwork at the moment, I console myself with the "movie trailer for my book" as Webb calls it, which one can find at YouTube by searching the title of the book. Very amusing A very enlightening, funny book with a sad beginning, a hair-raising middle and a very happy ending. Jun 23, Christina rated it really liked it. Data, A Love Story is the brutally honest account of how to succeed in the dating world online.

Amy Webb had a panic attack trying on clothes in Banana Republic and her sister called the store to get the sales associate to help Amy pick out date-worthy clothes. Amy Webb is right that a woman has to dumb down her profile and NOT lead with her accomplishments. I did this and all sorts of guys starting getting interested in me. I read the book from the middle to the end and through the notes because I Data, A Love Story is the brutally honest account of how to succeed in the dating world online.

I read the book from the middle to the end and through the notes because I wanted to get to the good parts quickly. Everything Amy Webb tells you to do is true. The quality of your photos is the number-one factor in whether guys will be interested in you.

It doesn't hurt if you're pretty and skinny. If you're not, you have to be shot in great photos and have a bulletproof profile and essay. You might think only guys are visual creatures. My male friend claims women are just as shallow in wanting to date attractive guys. Yet I can tell you the quality of your photos is a must.

Be brave, be yourself and don't lie about your height or weight. Don't tell a woman you graduated from Harvard if you barely eked out a GED. At least, I don't want to get involved with an unethical liar. Maybe another woman might want to. Data, A Love Story is top-shelf reading. Memorize the key points in Amy Webb's notes. Get quality photos taken. Write a witty essay that is breezy and conversational. You can game online dating. Amy shows you how. Feb 05, Helen rated it liked it Shelves: nonfiction , women , humor , love-and-romance.

This book appealed to me because I like tales of adventures and misadventures in relationships by writers who have a sense of humor miss you, Nora Ephron! I read an excerpt of Amy Webb's book on Slate. com and loved her description of her date with a man she found out was married when his wife called during their date. Good: She defined what she wanted in a mate and created a scoring system. Over the top: she created 10 10! fake men with profiles on JDate to get an understanding of what made popular women popular and how they interacted with men on the web site.

She created algorithms and spreadsheets to analyze this, which made her seem like a control freak if not downright manipulative. Reading this, I thought of Amazing Amy in "Gone Girl. For example, she learned it was important to have a nice picture, showing yourself enjoying life and showing some skin. It was a quick, enjoyable read that made me glad Amy found happiness.

Apr 14, Caitlin rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fiction , business. There's nothing wrong with being on online dating sites. But what if you create 10 fake profiles of the opposite sex so you can see what your "competition" is doing? Is that wrong or a brilliant way to hack the system and learn how algorithms work? That's what Amy Webb did when she decided that she was going to meet the man of her dreams on JDate.

After copying and pasting her resume into her online dating profile, she discovered that she just wasn't meeting the right type of man. When sh There's nothing wrong with being on online dating sites. When she did stumble across someone she really wanted to date, she realized that there was no way he was going to go out with her.

So she got smart, gamed the system, came up with a brilliant algorithm of her own, and started an experiment that would end at the altar. Amy's book is a hilarious, profanity-laced tell-all that is refreshing, funny, and genius.

Her book reads like a how-to manual at times when she explains how and why she created the specific formulas. Ever the journalist, Amy also cites her sources and provides additional resources on how she did what she did. I really liked this book. I had bought it at the same time as "Love in the Time of Algorithms" by Dan Slater. Where Dan's book was depressing because it revealed the slimy business side of the love industry, Amy's was heart-warming because in the end, she did meet the man of her dreams.

As of publication, they are happily married. Dec 21, Indera Johnson rated it it was amazing. I couldn't put this book down! This is an engrossing story of one woman's quest for true love, but it's told in a very modern, geeky way. Compared to other books written for the chick-lit set, this one doesn't pander to the audience.

Instead, it's smart and fresh. It's also brutally direct and honest. I can't think of many women willing to share such incredible details about their personal lives, and especially not in this way. I'd argue that the main takeaways have less to do with how to date o I couldn't put this book down!

I'd argue that the main takeaways have less to do with how to date online, though you'll find details in the book about that. The story is really about being fearless, finding confidence and out-thinking a system that doesn't work.

It just so happens that in the case of this book, the system is modern love. Love it. Love this book. Oct 04, Superbunny rated it did not like it. I don't know how this fucking author expects her dates to fucking like her when she's so fucking unlikeable - even I don't fucking like her. Which incidentally is also why this fucking book has such a fucking low rating. Did you notice how often I used the work fuck in my review? That's her favorite word btw and she fucking hates people who can't say the word fuck "like a fucking grown up".

I rest my case. May 08, Julia Milner rated it liked it Shelves: non-fiction , advice-for-career-life-adulting , just-watch-the-ted-talk , psychology-and-human-behaviour. Data, A Love Story is witty, fascinating, charming, informative, and meticulously data-driven. It got me re-thinking my ideas about online dating and provided an entertaining example of how we can use our brains to create great opportunities within the perplexing realm of modern romance.

Mar 10, Hope rated it it was amazing. This book has everything-- quantitative research, data, love I literally laughed and cried. This really was one if my favorite books. May 18, Ellen rated it liked it Shelves: nonfiction. I guess I'll see how good her advice is.

The result: seventy-two requirements ranging from the expected smart, funny to the super-specific likes selected musicals: Chess, Les Misérables. Not Cats. Must not like Cats! Next she turned to her own profile. In order to craft the most compelling online presentation, she needed to assess the competition—so she signed on to JDate again, this time as a man.

Then began the deluge—dozens of men wanted to meet her, men who actually met her requirements. Among them: her future husband, now the father of her child. Forty million people date online each year. Thanks to Data, a Love Story , their odds just got a whole lot better.

Futurist Amy Webb advises CEOs of the world’s most-admired companies, studio heads and showrunners, three-star admirals and generals, and the executive leadership of banks and intergovernmental organizations.

Founder and CEO of the Future Today Institute, a leading foresight and strategy firm that helps leaders and their organizations prepare for complex futures, Amy pioneered a data-driven, technology-led foresight methodology that is now used within hundreds of organizations globally. She is a professor of strategic foresight at the NYU Stern School of Business, where she developed and teaches the MBA course on strategic foresight and a Visiting Fellow at Oxford University’s Säid School of Business.

She was elected a life member to the Council on Foreign Relations and is a member of the World Economic Forum where she serves on a Global Future Council and Stewardship Board. A lifelong science fiction fan, Amy collaborates closely with Hollywood writers and producers on films, TV shows and commercials about science, technology and the future.

Webb was named by Forbes as one of the five women changing the world, listed as the BBC’s Women of , ranked on the Thinkers50 list of the 50 most influential management thinkers globally. Her latest book, The Genesis Machine, explores the futures of synthetic biology. close ; } } this. getElementById iframeId ; iframe. max contentDiv. scrollHeight, contentDiv. offsetHeight, contentDiv.

document iframe. Enhance your purchase. A lively, thought-provoking memoir about how one woman "gamed" online dating sites like JDate, OKCupid and eHarmony — and met her eventual husband. Previous page. Print length. Publication date. Reading age. See all details. Next page. Customers who bought this item also bought. Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1. The Signals Are Talking: Why Today's Fringe Is Tomorrow's Mainstream.

Amy Webb. Love at First Click: The Ultimate Guide to Online Dating. Laurie Davis. Calling in "The One" Revised and Expanded: 7 Weeks to Attract the Love of Your Life. Katherine Woodward Thomas.

The Big Nine: How the Tech Titans and Their Thinking Machines Could Warp Humanity. How to Not Die Alone: The Surprising Science That Will Help You Find Love. Logan Ury. The Grown Woman's Guide to Online Dating: Lessons Learned While Swiping Right, Snapping Selfies, and Analyzing Emojis. Margot Starbuck. Anyone who uses online dating sites must read her funny, fascinating book.

The book is about pragmatic approaches to partnership, the freedom that comes from asking for what you want, and the clarity that follows honest assessments of oneself and others. And it's brave, funny, and smart to boot. com and editor of Hell Hath No Fury: Women's Letters from the End of the Affair. Webb's color-coded and cross-indexed tale of her quest for exactly what she unapologetically wanted will make you look at data differently - and use it much, much better.

st and Change The Ratio. Amy Webb has literally written the book on online dating. This is online dating for geeks - for women - for men - for anyone who would like to meet their soulmate or just a playmate, and despairs of ever doing so. Spock meets Mary Tyler Moore, as logical Amy turns her life into an algorithm and finds the formula for love. Is this the future of romance? Buy this book and find out. Pleasant, geeky fun. AMY WEBB is an award-winning journalist who wrote for Newsweek , The Wall Street Journal , and other publications before founding Webbmedia Group, a digital-strategy consultancy that works with Fortune companies, major media companies and foundations, the government, and others.

She lives with her family in Baltimore, Maryland. About the author Follow authors to get new release updates, plus improved recommendations. Brief content visible, double tap to read full content. Full content visible, double tap to read brief content. Read more Read less. Customer reviews.

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There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later. Verified Purchase. I saw Amy's Ted Talk and had to buy the book. When done reading the last page, all I could say was "wow". She is totally inspiring using her strengths, supreme logic and smarts to find the elusive needle in the on line dating haystack.

The book is an easy read and on one level am amazing love story of a very different kind. Particularly because it is all true. I believe that you could not only apply her concept is the to point perfect partner to a stranger on a dating sight, but also to a present relationship that you are not sure is exactly ideal. I think her principles would be a good way of evaluating relationship if you set up your variables carefully. She lost me on some of the really technical math but those bits are mostly in the appendix and not integral to the book.

Also, I now have a huge appreciation for a "well crafted spreadsheet" and plan to pay more attention to applying Excel in my life! I highly recommend this book to anyone who likes happy endings or who is looking to find find a completely logical way to find that needle.

I met my husband of 25 years the 'old fashioned way' he was my girlfriend's boyfriend's friend LOL. His friend had amateur DJ equipment set up in his basement so we spent the night listening to all kinds of 60's, 70's and 80's music and discovered we had a lot in common. With the advent of the internet and the immense popularity of online dating, I was curious to read an account of this modern day ritual to see how it differs from the conventional dating of yesteryear.

If you are interested in how to proceed, how it works and what results you can expect from online dating, then this is the book for you, and you get the author's real-life love story as a bonus to boot. Webb's disastrous blind dates remind us of just how bad the dating scene can be. The advice on how to market oneself on on-line or in newspaper ads was useful.

Gaming the dating systems would be a lot of work and could be expensive. Her story is a 'case of one' her experience so I am not convinced that her method was the key to her success.

Still in the middle of reading it, love writer's humor. Have gifted to a friend as well. Well written, friendly and entertaining with real manageable action items that made an immediate difference in my own profile. Was talking to a friend about it and later gifted her a copy of the audiobook. I think she’s enjoying it. See all reviews. Top reviews from other countries.

Translate all reviews to English. The approach described in the book may not work for everyone, and the romantic backstory is a bit unbelievable but it's still a fun and thought-provoking read.

Amy Webb Tells TED How She Hacked Online Dating,The algorithms, statistics, charts, and lists I used to game online dating and find my match.

If that sounds familiar, then you’ll relate to Amy Webb’s story, in which she tries and fails in online dating – and tries again. And this time, she does those matching algorithms of those Shelves: non-fiction, dating, online-dating, memoir. Amy Webb's story, for all of her anal-retentive, control-freaky, color-coded spreadsheets is a pleasure to read. Her story of travel,  · Amy Webb was having no luck with online dating. The dates she liked didn't write her back, and her own profile attracted crickets (and worse). So, as any fan Amy Webb. 1, ratings reviews. Forty million people date online each year. Most don’t find true love. Thanks to Data, a Love Story, their odds just got a whole lot better. Data,  · Amy Webb, author of Data, A Love Story: How I Gamed Online Dating to Meet My Match, took to the TED stage to tell the story of how she hacked online dating. After a bad ... read more

Jul 27, Madeline rated it it was ok Shelves: no-judgements , memoir. I threw my gigantic bag, packed with my laptop and dating data, next to me as I sat down and sunk into the cushion. About Amy Webb. Was I worried about getting poisoned? The copy desk, no doubt, had yet another question.

So when I heard about Data, A Love Story I was immediately intrigued. In other words, he really had no intention of sailing. What was a good number? Next she turned to her own profile. The old one showed her in a suit, giving a lecture at a prestigious conference. I walked up the flight of stairs, put my key into the lock, and opened the door to my dark apartment. Amazon Drive Cloud storage from Amazon.

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